The fact that I’m posting about it means that it probably isn’t really that easy, right? There are a few challenging pieces of the puzzle that all need to come together to get C4R or Collaboration for Revit working on a real project. I just went through this process with a mechanical firm so it is all pretty fresh in my mind.

Firstly, note that A360 Team has been rebranded as BIM 360 Team and will be migrated, more details at this post.

Secondly, Autodesk really wants your whole team (like everyone, every consultant, every Revit link) on Collaboration for Revit. However, out in the real world it is just happening bit-by-bit, and in the meantime some hacks and workarounds can make the process a little bit easier.

A Quick Overview
Ok, so Collaboration for Revit runs on top of BIM 360 Team. What this means is that you need to have an active BIM 360 Team license if you wish to run projects. Then, you need a Collaboration for Revit license for each Revit user who will be connecting to that BIM 360 Team site. You still with me? This also means that persons outside of your firm may connect to your projects, provided they have their own Collaboration for Revit entitlement applied to their Autodesk account.

Once you have the BIM 360 Team license, and the Collaboration for Revit licenses, you then need to “Assign” the Collaboration for Revit licenses out to the users (using their Autodesk login details).

Finally, you need to actually do some stuff, like:

  • make a BIM 360 Team project,
  • invite the users,
  • initiate Revit models, and
  • get the links working.

Its a lot to take in, so you can see that the blog title is actually a half-joke 🙂 However, we were able to get all this up and running in about 4 hours for one firm, so you can too. Hopefully.

Something that will help
Given that there are a lot of moving pieces, I turned to my favourite research and documentation tool, OneNote. I have created a public notebook that you can view at this link:
Revit Collaboration Public Help

helpdoc.png

Basically all of the steps involved in getting the licensing setup, inviting users, installing the addin, and initiating models onto Collaboration for Revit are in the notebook linked above. I will continue to update and add to this over time.

Any Questions?
Just comment to this post and I will endeavour to answer your question in the notebook, or point you toward the answer.

Now, here are a few other bits and pieces that may be useful, if the notebook doesn’t answer your questions…

new help documentation:
https://knowledge.autodesk.com/support/revit-products/learn-explore/caas/CloudHelp/cloudhelp/2016/ENU/Revit-CAR/files/GUID-5A7EA270-AE79-447B-B12C-4C6B59D2F894-htm.html

moving models to folders:
https://knowledge.autodesk.com/support/revit-products/troubleshooting/caas/sfdcarticles/sfdcarticles/Collaboration-for-Revit-How-to-use-and-access-subfolders-on-A360-Team.html

You can move projects from A360 Free to a paid BIM360 Team hub by using the Transfer function:

transfer.png

Taking models offline and replacing later:
https://knowledge.autodesk.com/support/a360-collaboration-for-revit/learn-explore/caas/simplecontent/content/how-to-work-c4r-when-others-are-not-using-it.html

using local linked files
http://www.revitforum.org/worksharing-revit-server-c4r/28351-c4r-updating-links-6.html

Download links:
Collaboration for Revit 2017
Collaboration for Revit 2016

Collaboration for Revit 2015

Recent chat with Autodesk

I have posted many times over the past few years about Project Skyscraper, which then became Collaboration for Revit (C4R). Having used the cloud service in beta, I was keen to get it going on some live projects. Unfortunately, Collaboration for Revit was only available in the USA…

Until now, that is! Check out this press release for details on the global launch. Quote:
Released and available in North America only since December 7, 2014, Collaboration for Revit will be available for commercial global use as of January 7, 2016.  

A360_Collaboration_for_Revit_desk.jpg

 

ADK-15074-Skyscraper_UberGraphic_FIN-A-0

Autodesk A360 Collaboration for Revit is a service that works with Revit software to connect project teams with centralized access to BIM project data in the cloud.  Image courtesy of Autodesk

I, for one, am very excited about this. I have been involved in at least one geographically distributed vanilla Revit Server setup, and I think that the necessity to have ‘my IT people talk to your IT people to set up a DMZ between our VPNs’ is a bit counter-productive. In these situations, the global availability of C4R will really shine. Now, firms will be able to spin up a C4R instance very quickly and get working together, on real projects and in real-time.

You can hear Ralph Bond interviewing Sylvia Knauer on the Autodesk AEC Channel Podcast here in this mp3.

Between this global launch of Collaboration for Revit, and the improvements in the Glue – Navisworks connection in 2016 products, my Federated Model Streamer concept is one step closer to reality 🙂

I’m pretty sure this is what Revit Skyscraper is going to look like when it gets released, and I’m guessing it will be called “Collaboration for Revit” or “Revit Collaboration” (sounds like an addin, yeah?). Check out the image:

Those features again:

  • Multi-firm concurrent authoring
  • No IT setup required
  • BIM directly accessible to other Cloud Services

I’m not breaking NDA as this was a mailout from CTC, and you can register for the webinar here.

The open house is getting more ‘open’ every day. Go here to join the project:
Enter Revit Skyscraper Open House Project

After joining and logging in, access the downloads section, download the ZIP file and run the EXE. You should be greeted with something like this as the Citrix hosted solution starts up:

Once you have joined and have access to Revit Skyscraper, please feel free to comment below and I can add you to a Sandbox Project I have set up, and also add you as a contact for chat. Have fun!

I recommend you join the project and read some of the early forum posts, particularly if you pondering issues of IP, who owns the model, permissions and the like.

I’m very interested in where Paul is heading with this:
The QR Code pictured below, when scanned, will pull up the website, triggering the data in it to be sent to Revit. Picture a QR Code with info on a HVAC Unit, you scan it and the data is passed to Revit for when it was installed or serviced.

Sending Data in a URL to Revit. Data can be parsed to up date parameters of object.

Sending Data in a URL to Revit. Data can be parsed to update parameters of object.

This project fits into the larger scope of connecting our desktop Revit content creation with actual site information and making all of this accessible to entire teams on the cloud.

Read the whole post:
Revit and RabbitMQ: Passing Data in to Revit from Outside Applications | Architecture and Planning

EDIT: Paul provided the code in the comments below:
I found the code for this example. It is not pretty, but should be very simple. There are two files: the Revit Plugin and the Website.

REVIT PLUGIN
using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using Autodesk.Revit.DB;
using Autodesk.Revit.DB.Architecture;
using Autodesk.Revit.UI;
using Autodesk.Revit.UI.Selection;
using Autodesk.Revit.ApplicationServices;
using Autodesk.Revit.Attributes;
using RabbitMQ.Client;

[TransactionAttribute(TransactionMode.Manual)]
[RegenerationAttribute(RegenerationOption.Manual)]
public class RevitRabbit : IExternalCommand
{
public Result Execute(
ExternalCommandData commandData,
ref string message,
ElementSet elements)
{

string msg = null;
var connectionFactory = new ConnectionFactory();
IConnection connection = connectionFactory.CreateConnection();
IModel channel = connection.CreateModel();

BasicGetResult result = channel.BasicGet(“hello”, true);
if (result != null)
{
msg = Encoding.UTF8.GetString(result.Body);
System.Windows.Forms.MessageBox.Show(msg, “Status”);

}
else
{
System.Windows.Forms.MessageBox.Show(“No Messages Waiting.”, “Status”);
}

return Result.Succeeded;
}
}

WEBSITE
import cherrypy
import pika

class HelloWorld(object):
def index(self):

return “hi”
connection.close()
index.exposed = True

def paul(self,msg):
connection = pika.BlockingConnection(pika.ConnectionParameters(host=’localhost’))
channel = connection.channel()

channel.queue_declare(queue=’hello’)

channel.basic_publish(exchange=”,routing_key=’hello’,body=msg)
return msg
connection.close()

paul.exposed=True

cherrypy.quickstart(HelloWorld())

My idea from 4 months ago:

So, maybe its not Glue… with the benefit of current knowledge, maybe its Project Skyscraper, or some combination of these. But the External Reference possibility starts to make some of these things truly achievable. Watch this space!

The post from The Building Coder, 1 July 2014:
The Building Coder: Referenced Files as a Service

My tweet: