To do this, we can leverage a nice feature of the builtin Copy/Monitor feature. Its extremely simple, and here are the steps:

  1. Go to a 3D view and Isolate the Columns Category (so you can just see the Columns you want to split)
  2. Select all of them and Save a Selection (this is so we can cleanup later)
  3. Go to Collaborate tab and click Copy/Monitor – Use Current Project
  4. Options – Columns tab, tick “Split Columns by Levels”, Ok

    split.png

  5. Click Copy, tick Multiple, Select all the Columns, then click the little Finish button
    little%2Bfinish.png
  6. Click the big Finish button
    big%2Bfinish.png
  7. If you want to delete the old ones, load the Saved Selection from step 2 and press Delete
  8. Done!

It would be nice if there was a “Split Pipes by Level” box hiding somewhere 🙂

3ds.png

If you are using multiple instances of Revit, against one Central file, using different ‘pseudo’ usernames, you may have run into trouble because Autodesk single sign on (SSO) always keeps you logged out in that situation. As soon as you log in, all your Revit usernames get switched back to your SSO username.

Okay, so how can we work around this? Basically, by using psexec to launch Revit using another Windows user. This allows us to have SSO running in one ‘Windows user’ and SSO logged out in the other.

Steps:

  1. Ensure you have psexec available
  2. Make a CMD with this text (for Revit 2015):
    psexec -u OtherWindowsUsername -p OtherWindowsUserPassword -d -i “C:\Program Files\Autodesk\Revit 2015\Revit.exe” /language ENU
  3. Open Revit in current user and sign out of A360
  4. Run this CMD file, and in the new instance of Revit you can sign back into A360

The workaround and outcome is shown in the image below:

 As usual, there may be complications with this method (such as access to different network resources etc), so please use at your own risk 🙂

Did you know you can nest a Generic Model family in a Generic Model Adaptive family and create a form that allows the swapping of the Profile Type?

Post by gaby424
Use Adaptive Components
-you can draw profiles as simple shared generic models families (you don`t have to use profiles template)

-nest them in a generic model adaptive family and instanciate them 2 times in paralel planes
-put a family type parameter on their label fields (the same for bouth)
-carefully select only theirs segments for bouth the profiles using ctrl+click & TAB key (you can also just select the 2 instances but you can receive an error message in the next step)
-press create form button
-create voids to cut the ends as in your truss family
now play with changing the family type parameter (assuming you have more than one profile in family/project) 

via
2013: Chnage profile of sweep in nested family

Helpful…

Revit time travel?

Ever felt this way? (via (@apertedesign)

Even Revit knows that new features will be added in the future:

This post used to be titled Another dimension beyond XYZ?  Inches to the fourth power …
but I have decided to collect funny Revit error messages and put them all here.
I received this message from Revit recently:

Then this tweeted image reminded me of it:

via Twitter / architect_face: Anyone had this error before? …
Evidently, Revit sometimes gets a bit confused by certain combinations of formulas and / or units?
EDIT:  Here’s another good one-

via
Square feet per foot dialog | BD Mackey Consulting | The Revit Geek Blog

EDIT:   And some more-

LOL. It’s funny but it’s not legit- I made the app, and the error…

And some warnings:

EDIT: Another one

and one from Aaron Maller

EDIT:  More will be added below–

Another square feet per foot:

 

 

 

This one via Revit OpEd: These are not the Warnings You are Looking For

 

 

“Lumps of Roofs”

Still not sure if this one was real:

Be careful of those ridiculously large journal files:

‘becasue’

More:

Update: now try this method

Revit Architecture 2012

Revit Structure 2012

Revit MEP 2012

I recommended using Firefox with Downthemall to download these files. Finally, be sure to confirm the checksums / hashes before beginning the install.
EDIT:  Some people were having problems with these links.  However, this should no longer be a problem.
If you are interested in Student version links, go to this page.

Revit Fox recently re-posted about the 6 Phases of Revit.  Ultimate credit for this apparently goes to Chris Zoog.

It is “perhaps the most re-posted Revit resource in history!”
http://seilercadsupport.wordpress.com/2010/12/11/the-6-phases-of-a-revit-user/

One of the oldest blog posts I found about it was at REVITit http://revitit.com/blog/?page_id=207

I am trying to find the ‘original’ post document to link to it – anyone have any idea where the ‘oldest’ ‘in the wild’ version of this exists?

In harmony with the title of this blog, I thought the description of the final phase was worth re-stating (yet again, I know…)  Here it is:

You have mastered nearly all things Revit. You “know” what Revit “likes”, and what it “dislikes” during model construction, a sixth sense, really. You spend your time exploring and tweaking advanced scheduling, OBDC, external parameters, AR3. You have a template to beat all templates, families for every situation.

Copyright 2003 Chris Zoog

To know What Revit Wants is indeed to “know” what Revit “likes”, and what it “dislikes”…a sixth sense, really.

The existence of the Adaptive Component feature isn’t really a secret. But it is one of the coolest things about Revit 2011. Imagine a family that lets you push and pull points in 3D space…and imagine that those points then drive all the geometry inside the family.

It is very nearly cool. However, I say ‘nearly’ because there are definitely some serious limitations. Autodesk has come out and listed some of these limitations, such as:
adaptive components can only be placed in a conceptual mass family, an in-place mass, a curtain panel by pattern family, or another adaptive component family.

This is a real shame, because this is going to be one of the most powerful modelling tools in Revit 2011. If only we could use them in all categories!

Look out for some very cool forms in the next few weeks, as users start to get the hang of Adaptive Components. And look out for some very neat workarounds and tricks to get the most from this new feature.

No, not aeroplanes: we are talking about Reference Planes. So, the tip is:

Always name reference planes that you intend to keep and use.

Reference Planes lie at the very core of What Revit Wants. Revit is a program, so it needs parameters. In order for understand objects in 3D space, it needs to establish a ‘plane’ to work from. Obviously, Reference Planes are the basic, garden variety type of Revit plane – there are also Grids and Levels. These are just planes that do some special things, like host a view.

If you want to quickly see what planes exist in your project, open a 3D view and then start the ‘Set Work Plane’ command. This dialog shows all the NAMED planes, including grids and levels. Can you start to see why you should name Reference Planes you intend to keep and use? That way, you can quickly make them ‘current’ by using this command.

This also allows you to clean up your drawing. If you adopt this tip, let’s say you come back to a drawing a few months later and it is absolutely cluttered with Reference Planes. Which ones can you safely delete? Well, you have named all the important ones, so you can delete the rest!