Whenever you are looking to implement a new technology in your firm, you typically go through a few steps:

  1. Figure out what is out there in the marketplace – What products are available?
  2. Collect data about all of the technologies that may suit your use case
  3. Rigorously compare and analyse all the data
  4. Make a decision and go for it

There are some excellent content management tools out there for Revit now, so how can you choose? I went through a very comprehensive research analysis of a number of Revit CMS platforms, and I posted about the process here.

Then I caught up with Steve Germano over at Unifi to talk about the results. You can view (or just listen) to it here:

Feel free to comment here with your thoughts and we can keep the conversation going!

Curtain Walls in Revit are strictly a Family of the Walls Category. Then you have Types for each type of Curtain Wall. What if you want to select all Curtain Walls at once? You can’t multi-select types in the Project Browser to do this, but…

You can make a suitable Schedule to do it. Here’s how:

  1. Make a new Wall Schedule
  2. Only add the Family data field
  3. In Sorting / Grouping tab, Sort by: Family and untick ‘Itemize every instance’
  4. Now, in the schedule, click inside the Curtain Wall cell, and
  5. Use Highlight in Model to select them all

You could then use Save Selection, or Temporarily Isolate Elements in View, depending on what you want to do next.

Edwin Prakoso over at CAD Notes recently posted a few tips on how to make your Revit presentation views look more engaging and interesting. Here are my top 4 from his top 10:

  • Use ambient shadow. It gives more impact … and makes sure your view doesn’t look flat.
  • Use sketchy lines. Hand drawing images often look very artistic and interesting. You can achieve the similar effect by using this option.
  • Enable Smooth Anti-aliasing. It gives great impact when you use sketchy lines option.
  • Use background color. You can play with the background color to make it stand out.

One that I would add would be to add a little bit of Transparency. See some example settings below:

Image by What Revit Wants

 

Image from CAD Notes

Source post: https://www.cad-notes.com/10-revit-hacks-to-make-your-revit-view-compelling/

Do you have any tips to make your Revit views look better? Feel free to comment here.

The first Revit point update each year typically brings some features that the dev team didn’t quite have cooked for the initial release, and this year we get something pretty special… the ability to apply Browser Organisation to Schedules node of the Project Browser. It has been that one long, messy part of the PB for a while, and I welcome that this long-requested feature has now been implemented! Good job Factory 🙂

Note that after this update is applied, there will be two versions of Dynamo Core installed, 1.2.2.373 and 1.3.1.1736…

Here are the links:

Direct Download Revit 2018.1

Readme

Release Notes

The second post in this series is focused on the Project Browser. The first post in the series described how to get your user interface and lab environment ready…

Note:

Please open Revit, and open the rac_advanced_sample_project.rvt

Please download and import the supplied KeyboardShortcuts.xml

KeyboardShortcuts

You can download the rac_advanced_sample_project here

 

Let’s learn about the Revit Project Browser…

If we use the Project Browser effectively, we will be better and faster at Revit.

 

Search:

  • Use Project Browser Search – always

 

Search Exercise:

  • Switch to Site view
  • Search for “shrub” in the Project Browser (right-click to start the search command)
  • Place some more Planting around the carpark

 

Keyboard shortcut tip: try pressing Q for Move

 

Type Properties:

Type Properties Exercise:

  • Right-click on a Type in the PB to get to Type Properties…
  • Try it for a shrub type
  • Edit the Height
  • Remember: we can double-click on the shrub to jump to type properties

 

Family Preview:

Notice the Preview for supported types!

Click Preview button next to a Shrub type to try it

Surprising how many families are supported with this preview feature…

 

Type Deletion:

Right-click on multiple Types to Delete them all at once:

Type Deletion Exercise:

  • Try selecting Roof – Steel Bar Joist – Steel Deck – EPDM Membrane
  • And
  • Stair – Carriage – Carriage – Paint – 50 mm Width
  • And deleting both types at once

 

Browser Organisation for Sheets:

You can Filter Sheets in the Project Browser by the “Print Set” – that is, by saved sheet selection.

Sheet Browser Exercise:

  • Type BO to start Browser Organisation without mouse
  • Change Sheets to By Set
  • Check how that works
  • Click OK
  • Change back to All

 

Right-click for multiple ‘new’ commands

Sheet:

Legends:

Schedules:

New Schedule Exercise:

  • Make a new Wall Schedule with this method
  • While you are it, add a calculated value for Average Wall Ht like this:
  • Then pick one of the Walls and Highlight in Model
  • Then immediately pick the Section Box tool from the QAT
  • The Set Workplane to the wall (QAT)
  • Add dimension (QAT), to verify the schedule results

 

Right-click in the Project Browser:

Right-click Families node to Save All Families:

Right-click Revit Links for New Link and Manage Links:

Right-click a Sheet to Add a view:

Right-click sheet exercise:

  • Make a new A1 sheet with right-click in the PB
  • Add View
  • Add newly created Wall Schedule – will be too big

 

Revit Links:

You can Unload for yourself or everyone from the Project Browser:

 

Family Management:

Did you know that the Project Browser Families node provides access to more than just traditional component families?

For example, you can use the Project Browser to quickly select different types of Filled Regions:

System Family Management and RevitLookup Exercise:

  • Select All Instances of Concrete filled region
  • There should be 1
  • But where is it? In a workshared project we would see the view workset.
  • Go to Add-ins
  • Revit Lookup – snoop current selection
  • Find the OwnerViewId
  • Copy the Name
  • Use Search in Project Browser
  • Found it!

 

In Part 3, we will have a closer look at Revit Keyboard Shortcuts.

Wow.

This is one of the best workarounds I have seen for years in Revit! Did you know that you can rotate a Revit Floor Plan view in 3 dimensions?

Try it now:

  1. Go to a Floor Plan view and make sure the Crop Region is turned on
  2. Now open a Section or Elevation View
  3. Tile the windows in Revit so you can see both views
  4. Select the Crop Region in the Floor Plan view
  5. Switch to the Section or Elevation view (the Crop Region is still selected)
  6. Start the Rotate command in the Section or Elevation view
  7. Rotate the Floor Plan away from the horizontal plane. Try 20 degrees.
  8. Experiment with the above process until you have created a sort of forced orthographic view… but Revit thinks it is a Floor Plan! You may have to switch between some sections running perpendicular to each other and keep rotating the Floor Plan crop region until you capture the view you want.

This means you can have Rooms showing. Which means you can have a Room Color Scheme showing up in a ‘kind of’ 3D view in Revit. This is awesome!

It is also a nice way to see how View Range works. As you experiment with the View Range of this special Floor Plan, you will see more or less of the elements (a bit like a 3D section box).

Not sure of the limitations or problems yet, but I had to share 🙂

Thanks to pepar for sharing on slack, and cadconsulting for making the video.