Previously, this was all working with the old Desktop Connector and b360provider.exe (I think?) but the new versions of Desktop Connector seem to have broken the ability to ‘browse’ C4R Revit models on BIM 360… and guess what? There is no Solution. This functionality is in fact ‘by design’. You can copy and paste a non-C4R Revit model to BIM 360 Docs via the connector, and that RVT will be visible in Windows Explorer. But if you have C4R initialised Revit models on BIM 360 Docs, they will not be visible under the BIM 360 (Preview) node in Windows Explorer. You can only view those C4R Revit files in their folder structure by navigating through Revit 2018.3 or newer.

This is the feedback from Autodesk:

Revit cloud models (C4R models) are not supported in Desktop connector. They won’t be showing up in Desktop Connector. Published C4R models are only available in Revit and Docs.


For C4R models, published models will have all versions in BIM 360. This will be recommended workflow to manage models:
https://knowledge.autodesk.com/support/revit-products/learn-explore/caas/CloudHelp/cloudhelp/2016/ENU/Revit-CAR/files/GUID-AE6DBCDF-3DB1-41CB-9DC5-B0C336E6C851-htm.html

You can also save copies of the model locally to put in your backup system. Also from each user’s machine, C4R cache will be another source of backups. 

Also refer to How to backup Revit cloud models

I went looking for another answer, but there really isn’t one. Below is a list of steps I took to play around with the Desktop Connector installation. In the end, the only way I can foresee being able to ‘automate’ onsite BIM 360 Docs backups will be to leverage the CollaborationCache folder. You will need some Revit API know-how to forcibly populate this through some BIM 360 Reload methods (refer here).  Unfortunately this will be a flat list of files without descriptive names, so there will have to be some workarounds and cleanup scripts in place (we already have a system of BIM 360 file management in VirtualBuiltApp).  I intend to post some more about these workarounds in future.

Keep reading for excessive detail on my Desktop Connector journey …

___________________________________________________________________________________

I used Glary Utilities Uninstall tool:

Entry shown:

"C:\ProgramData\Package Cache\{b46602fe-a358-48c4-a0e0-905010df08e2}\DesktopConnector.exe" /modify

Uninstalled this old version. Interestingly, there were 3 different uninstall processors triggered? Like I had three different versions installed?

 

 

Also tried removing this folder and reinstalling:

I found a pile of errors in the diagnostic logs:

CDX pipleline builder output
Output=Warnings received from AddInStore.Rebuild
========================
Could not connect up a part in a pipeline to its neighbors: AddInAdapter Name: "ISecureSettingsProviderViewToContractAddInAdapter" Location: "AddInSideAdapters\Comet.AddInFramework.DataSourceProviders.ProviderAdapters.dll".

and a few of these

========================
Could not connect 2 valid add-in model parts.
========================

========================
While inspecting an assembly, caught a BadImageFormatException: The file is not a valid binary: C:\Program Files\Autodesk\Desktop Connector\AddIns\ADriveConnector\AdWebServices.dll This occurred while inspecting assembly C:\Program Files\Autodesk\Desktop Connector\AddIns\ADriveConnector\AdWebServices.dll.
========================

========================
While inspecting an assembly, caught a BadImageFormatException: The file is not a valid binary: C:\Program Files\Autodesk\Desktop Connector\AddIns\ADriveConnector\AdWebServicesUI.dll This occurred while inspecting assembly C:\Program Files\Autodesk\Desktop Connector\AddIns\ADriveConnector\AdWebServicesUI.dll.
========================

This note seemed useful:

Starting CDX pipline builder: C:\Program Files\Autodesk\Desktop Connector\Comet.Applications.PipelineBuilder.exe C:\Program Files\Autodesk\Desktop Connector

 

I scanned through the Registry and deleted old references to Desktop Connector.

 

Found this link with the command line switches: here

Tried an install from elevated command prompt:

C:\Temp>DesktopConnector-x64.exe /install /quiet

Note: you do not actually need the Desktop Connector to collaborate on BIM 360 Revit projects in the cloud. You only need Revit 2018.3 or newer, and the relevant license for Revit Cloud Collaboration (too hard to keep track of the names but I think ‘BIM 360 Design’ is the current terminology).

You will be able to see this link in Revit 2018.3 or newer:

When ‘linking’ Revit models, CAD files, and other resources, you will see this option when working in a cloud workshared model:

These models will be temporarily stored in the CollaborationCache folder:

We have been using HoloBuilder to capture as-built conditions on a huge hospital project, in order to maintain the federated BIM dataset (BIM to FM / Asset Information Management). 360 photos are a very quick and easy way to capture the context of building elements, but not their geometry.

 

This tip comes from one of our local HoloBuilder experts, Lisa Verschoor:

How to move across an updated drawing/sheet in HoloBuilder and have the already existing waypoints attached to the earlier version carry over automatically

    • Open HoloBuilder
    • Select sheet you want to replace (in example pic below I’m replacing sheet 020-H-003)
    • Click on the “Exchange this sheet” button (two opposing arrows)

 

    • Prompt will ask “Do you really want to replace the current Sheet with a new one?”
    • Click Ok
    • Now drag and drop updated sheet
    • Select High Res option
    • Ok
    • All done! 🙂

You may have noticed that Revizto notifications now provide a direct link to Open that issue in Revizto. This special hyperlink will prompt to open Revizto, and it will jump to the correct issue in the Issue Tracker.

The special link is made of a few parts, notice the project number and issue ID in bold below:

https://api.sydney.revizto.com/v4/region/redirect?url=revizto%3A//viewer/50789/issue_tracker/44

Using the predictable syntax above, you can use your own Revizto regional server, project number and issue ID to create these hyperlinks yourself, either in Excel or programmatically.

You can leverage this mini-api in a number of ways:

  • you can paste these links into the Revizto Issue Tracker to allow you to jump between issues in Revizto
  • paste the links into Word or Excel or other emails as part of a larger report or conversation
  • inject these links into another BIM platform such as a Revit URL field, so that you can jump from a specific item in Revit to the related Revizto issue
  • use these special links in a project portal or project management system

This is just the beginning for a new era of connectedness between the Revizto Issue Tracker and other platforms… watch this space!

From Autodesk: Here is the URL to download the Desktop Connector. Please download and install the latest version to continue to use the Desktop Connector.

PLESE NOTE: This update must be completed by July 31 in order to continue to use the Desktop Connector.

This update also includes the following improvements:

  • Support for right-click functionality to delete files & folders, rename folders, and create folders
  • Improved caching to improve the user experience and performance
  • Recent bug fixes. For updates, view our list of known issues.

Please download and install this new version to take advantage of these updates. NOTE: The new installer will remove any previous installations of the Desktop Connector automatically.

DOWNLOAD THE UPDATE
For additional details on the updates to the Desktop Connector and the latest BIM 360 releases, please visit the BIM 360 Release Notes.

If you Close All Worksets when opening a model on BIM 360 Design, you may get this error (related to Project Info):

Can’t edit the element. It was deleted in the Central Model.

 

As you can see, it is related to the Project Info : Project Information element:


The error looks like this. You must click Cancel to proceed:

It appears to be some synchronisation bug or similar, possibly related to BIM 360 cloud worksharing. You can force the error to reappear by clicking on the Location option in the Ribbon

To fix it, try doing a full Sync with Central. It seems that this rectifies the bug for that session and future sessions with that particular cloud workshared model.

I have been finetuning my office-at-home recently, and it turns out I have lots of computer screens available. However, it is not always easy to connect multiple (like 4) screens to one computer or laptop. What if you could use a piece of software to extend your available screens onto another computer entirely?

That’s where spacedesk comes in…

  1. Ensure both computers or laptops are on the same LAN
  2. Install the server software on your main PC (the one you actually want to work on)
    Windows 10 64 bit or 32 bit or Others
  3. Install the client software on the machine that has spare monitors (you are just going to use these as slaves to the main pc)
    Windows or Others including Apple etc
  4. Launch the client software
  5. Click on the server PCspacedesk VIEWER - BETA O.g.g.z.52 (expiry date: December 31st 2018) 
File View Functionality Settings Help 
spacedesk— 
Connect to Primary Machine (Server) 
META80X1 (10.0.0.15) 
Disconnected 
Loc: 
Rem: 
Fps: 
Mbps: 
Rcvd:

  6. A window launches, you can use View – Full Screen
  7. Repeat steps 4-6 for each secondary monitor you want to add from other pcs
  8. These show up in Windows and you can adjust resolution:

 

 

Basically this is screen extension or mirroring technology, so you will still be bound to network speed and may experience some compression, because your main pc is actually sending frames over the network to the other pc. Overall, it seems to work quite well.

Go crazy with multiple monitors people!

Read the documentation here

If you have moved your project onto BIM 360 Docs, it might make sense to store related project resources (Shared Parameter files and Classification resources like Uniformat) in the same cloud as well.

 

Here’s how you can do it (using Revit 2018.3):

  1. Setup the BIM 360 connector still currently in beta
  2. Ensure you can see the BIM 360 (Preview) item in Windows Explorer
  3. Using BIM 360, create a suitable folder under the Project Files area, and upload your resource file, such as UniformatClassifications_2010.txt
  4. Browse to that folder in Windows Explorer:

  5. Open Revit
  6. Navigate to Manage – Additional Settings – Assembly Code Settings
  7. Click Browse
  8. Copy and Paste the folder address from Windows Explorer (which actually shows the local sync location for BIM 360 data, typically C:\Users\YourUserName\BIM 360\YourBIM360License\YourBIM360Project\Project Files\
  9. Back in Revit, after navigating to the correct BIM 360 folder, select the text file resource and click Open
  10. Revit detects that this resource is stored on BIM 360 Docs and you can proceed…
  11. Sync your model to save the settings

You should be able to use the same process to save other files like Keynote references and Shared Parameter files in the cloud. Keep in mind that you will still have to manage BIM 360 access control, as you probably don’t want multiple people actually be able to edit these files.

Assembly Code on BIM 360

Don’t forget you can also get the free Autodesk Classification Manager for Revit here.

 

If you are still running a relatively small SSD (like 512gb), you might see that your C drive fills up pretty quickly while working on a large BIM 360 Design Revit cloud worksharing project. See below image, where the CollaborationCache folder is using almost 50gb of space on my machine:

 

While I realise that the SSD is the best place to have that data in terms of performance, if you don’t have the space available you may consider moving your CollaborationCache folder to a secondary, larger hard drive. I used a symbolic link to do this, with the script below:

if exist "%localappdata%\Autodesk\Revit\Autodesk Revit 2018\CollaborationCache" rename "%localappdata%\Autodesk\Revit\Autodesk Revit 2018\CollaborationCache" CollaborationCache.old
mklink /d "%localappdata%\Autodesk\Revit\Autodesk Revit 2018\CollaborationCache" E:\C4R
if not exist E:\C4R MD E:\C4R
robocopy /mir "%localappdata%\Autodesk\Revit\Autodesk Revit 2018\CollaborationCache.old" E:\C4R\

 

This creates a folder called C4R on your E drive, copies the CollaborationCache over, and sets up the symbolic link. To use it:

  1. Sync all Revit instances and shut down Revit completely
  2. Make a CMD from the code above and run it as Administrator (elevated privileges required for mklink )
  3. In Explorer, confirm you have the symlink and delete the .old folder :

  4. Start Revit 2018

 

Please use the script with care 🙂

You can also refer to my previous post where I did the same with the Tekla BIMsight cache folder.

A while back on the There’s no BIM like home, there was a very interesting post that aimed to use simple language to describe BIM projects and process. According to the author, the XKCD Simple Writer Tool was used to develop the text. Some of the ideas are somewhat UK centric, but the overall concept is great. Here is just one paragraph:

After a builder wins the job, they plan with their team what parts of the job they will do [responsibility matrix], what information is needed and by when [master information delivery plan], as well as how information needs to be set out [standards, methods, and procedures]; writing all of this into a single agreed plan for everyone to follow [post contract-award BIM execution plan]. To make sure everyone can follow the plan, the builders check their team’s skills [supply chain assessments] before starting the job.

In BIM world, we can certainly get carried away with terminology and abbreviations and acronyms. But this is a good reminder that much of our work can actually be described in easy-to-understand language. Check out the full post by author Dan Rossiter at this link.

I previously posted about how to quickly repath links based on some control mechanisms. Enter BIM 360, and the wild world of Revit cloud worksharing… I expect that it will be commonplace now for existing projects and datasets to move across to BIM360 ‘mid project’. But that creates some interesting problems, like creating folders, dealing with the initiation process, and replacing local Revit Links with their cloud versions.

This post is focused on that process of changing all of the Revit link paths to link to the BIM 360 models. Unfortunately, the previous method I used (TransmissionData, like eTransmit) is not available for cloud hosted models. So how do we automate this process?

We went about it this way:

  1. Initiate all Revit models on the BIM 360 Document Management cloud (manually, for now)
  2. Create one federated model on the BIM 360 cloud that links in all the other cloud hosted Revit models. You might do this one manually, using Reload From in the Manage Links dialog box.
  3. Once you have that one ‘super host model’, use a batch process to harvest all of the cloud model data
  4. Using the harvested data, create a script that implements a Reload From method to batch reload local models from their cloud counterpart

On the journey to solving step 3, I experimented with a few different methods. I discovered that you need to use the ExternalResource class to get information about BIM 360 cloud models (not ExternalReference).

I also realised that I had to deal with Reference Information, which appears to be a .NET dictionary per link that stores some funky Forge IDs and so on. But I want to store all this data in our VirtualBuiltApp BIM Management system, so I had to serialise the Reference Information to a string that could be stored in a database VARCHAR field (or push to Excel if you are still doing things the old way). Dimitar Venkov gave me a few tips about using JSON with IronPython in Dynamo (thanks mate!), so after that all the harvesting pieces were in place!

Here is some of the harvesting and JSON code. Notice that I played around with using a container class to pass data between Dynamo nodes. In the end, JSON string was the answer:

 data = []
for u in unwraps:
    data.append(u.GetExternalResourceReference(linkresource))

class dummy(object):
    def ToString(self):
        return 'container'
container = dummy()

sdicts = []

for y in data:
    dictinfo = ExternalResourceReference.GetReferenceInformation(y)
    container.dictinfo = dictinfo
    infos.append(container)
    shortnames.append(ExternalResourceReference.GetResourceShortDisplayName(y))
    versionstatus.append(ExternalResourceReference.GetResourceVersionStatus(y))
    insessionpaths.append(y.InSessionPath)
    serverids.append(y.ServerId)
    versions.append(y.Version)
    sdicts.append(json.dumps(dict(dictinfo)))

The next step was to create the ‘batch reload from’ tool. Now that we had the necessary data, we just had to use it to grab the matching cloud path information (from our database) and apply it to each Revit link.

I created a node that essentially built a new reference path from the JSON and other data that we had harvested. Here is some of that code:

 des = []
for x in referencesInfo:
    des.append(json.loads((x)))
newdicts = []
for y in des:
    newdicts.append(Dictionary[str, str](y))

serverGuids = []
for g in serverIdsIn:
    tempguid = Guid(g)
    serverGuids.append(tempguid)

newrefs = []
for z in range(len(referencesInfo)):
    serverIdIn = serverGuids[z]
    referenceInfo = newdicts[z]
    versionInfo = versionsInfo[z]
    sessionPathIn = sessionsPathIn[z]
    tempRef = ExternalResourceReference(serverIdIn, referenceInfo, versionInfo, sessionPathIn)
    newrefs.append(tempRef)

OUT = newrefs

The final step was to get a RevitLinkType and a matching ReferenceInformation and apply them to each other. I stored the data in our cloud based BIM Management Application, VirtualBuiltApp. Then I could easily just pull the data into Dynamo with a suitable database connector, and match up the RevitLinkType in the current file with its associated cloud identity. For that genuine 90s feel, you could use Excel to store the data as it is just a JSON string and some other strings:

Here is the key bit of code that actually changes the link path (without all of my other error checking bits and pieces):

     try:
        newCloudPath = newCloudPaths[l]
        reloaded = fileToChange.LoadFrom(newCloudPath, defaultconfig)
        successlist.append(reloaded.LoadResult)
        TransactionManager.Instance.ForceCloseTransaction()
    except:
        successlist.append("Failure, not top level link or workset closed")

To actually implement the script and get productive, I opened 4 instances of Revit, and then used this process in each instance:

  1. Open the Revit file from BIM 360, with Specify… all worksets closed
  2. Unload all links
  3. Open all worksets
  4. Run the Reloader Script
  5. Confirm link status in Manage Links
  6. Optional: Add ‘bim 360 links loaded’ text to Start View (just for tracking purposes)
  7. Optional: Add comment to VirtualBuiltApp (optional, for tracking purposes)
  8. Close and Sync

In this way I can have 4 or more sessions operating concurrently, fixing all the link paths automatically, and I just need to gently monitor the process.

One nice thing is that I set the script up to immediately Unload a link after it had obtained and applied the new Path information. This means that the Revit instance does not get bogged down with many gigs of link data in memory, and in fact this is way faster than trying to use Manage Links for a similar process.

Ideally I would like to fully automate this, to the point where it opens each file, runs the script, and syncs. Unfortunately, time didn’t allow me to get all the code together for that (for now).

Finally, because we are using our custom built schema and validation tools, we can easily create visuals like this:

Modified versions of the Dynamo graphs can be found on the Bakery Github here:

dyn folder