Sometimes you have a set of DWFs that you would like to work with in Revit. For example, you might have DWFs of site equipment, fences and trucks that would be useful for site modelling in Revit. Here is one way to get those dwfs into a more Revit-friendly format…

Note: You need to have iConstruct with their Smart IFC Exporter for this workflow

Phase 1
Create a container NWD for DWF files, so that you can fix rotation and coordinates:

  1. Append DWFs
  2. Save as rotator.nwd
  3. Append to an NWF
  4. Adjust units, 90 degree rotation about 1-0-0 axis as per this link:
    http://forums.autodesk.com/t5/navisworks-general-discussion/naviswork-imports-dwfx-file-incorrectly-quickpen-dwfx-export/m-p/2879154#M1154
  5. Save as container.nwf

Phase 2
Steps to convert DWF to IFC with colours and object selectability:

  1. Open two Navisworks 2016 instances
  2. Open the rotator.nwd from above in one instance
  3. Append any DWFs you would like to convert
  4. Adjust their Units and Transform until they look right
  5. Save the rotator.nwd
  6. Open the container.nwf
  7. Refresh to reload the rotator if necessary
  8. Now, hide everything but ‘shell’ elements using a search like this:
  9. Save the search set for Item Type = Shell
  10. Set up an iConstruct IFC config…

    IFC2x3
    New
    Type a Name
    Press Building button
    Expand to IfcBuildingElementProxy, userdefined
    Choose search set for Item Type = Shell from above

    Save

  11. Should look like this…

  12. Close config dialog
  13. Go to Smart IFC Export and choose the export config you just saved
  14. Fill out next dialog and press ok
  15. Choose target IFC location
  16. Wait for Navisworks to export the IFC

Phase 3 – into Revit
After IFC is created, open Revit. Ensure you have latest IFC updates installed, then open the the IFC. Wait for Revit to complete importing… For the most part, you should get a pretty good looking result. One exception is where the DWF had one ‘shell’ with multiple materials, like this:

In any case, now you have a bunch of ‘Revit elements’ (yes, I use the term loosely) that can be made into Model Groups. They aren’t in families, but you can make them into little rvts to load as links. I realise there are some limitations in this workflow, but in some cases there is no other way…

If you are interested in more to do with DWF conversions, check out these links:

What Revit Wants: How to Convert a DWF to Editable Format, or How to Export from Navisworks and Keep Modelling in BIM
What Revit Wants: Convert DWF to DWG using free tools

Future post: hope to see some Dynamo method to consume DWFs and create DirectShapes in Revit 🙂

You can request the templates from Autodesk using this form.

COBie Toolkit for Autodesk Revit 2011
Download Now

COBie Toolkit for Autodesk Revit 2012
Download Now

COBie Toolkit for Autodesk Revit 2013
Download Now
For a step by step guide on how to install and configure Revit for COBie (Construction Operations Building Information Exchange), download the following document:http://projects.buildingsmartalliance.org/files/?artifact_id=5312

Or you can use these older direct links (based on Revit 2010)
Creating a “COBie2” Enabled Project in Revit (download files)

via

Its hard to find an unbiased comparison of Revit and ArchiCAD.  Ranting flame wars rage continually on LinkedIn…

That’s why it is refreshing to see a logical, itemised comparison of the two softwares.  Check it out at:
Scott H MacKenzie: ArchiCAD vs. Revit (part 1)
Life in a Virtual Building: ArchiCAD vs. Revit – 2D & 3D Modification Tools (part 2)

Heads-up via Shoegnome (find him on Twitter here)

Free Add-In developed for use by Autodesk Revit programs in the Structure and MEP disciplines. This application is recommended for use with IFC-based model exchange between GRAPHISOFT ArchiCAD and Revit applications. The Add-In for Revit applications variously enables direct import of ArchiCAD IFC models and IFC model export to ArchiCAD, or serves to optimize Revit’s standard IFC import and export functions used to exchange data with ArchiCAD.

via
Interoperability Downloads

The download page linked above was updated: Wednesday, August 22, 2012

Heads up – Revit3D

Okay, we are not all in love with Revit – it can even be frustrating at times.

But check out this link:
http://blog.lpainc.com/lpa-blog/bid/20431/Why-REVIT-Works

In part, the author states “Here at LPA, we’ve begun to bring all of the various integrated sustainable design disciplines in-house, which I think directly relates to the adoption and full utilization of Revit and all its potential.”

I discussed some similar comments in my What Inspires You? post.

We here at Dimond Architects continually strive to keep pace with current and emerging technologies, and have made a significant shift from AutoCAD to Revit as our design and documentation software of choice.

The result of this shift is a better, more comprehensive and coordinated architectural package that can be delivered to the Client in a variety of interesting forms.