Using some Visibility parameters and a simple formula structure, you can use a Revit family to store a collection elements and then selectively show them by using a single lookup value. This allows you to drive many visibility states (programmatically) through the modification of a single instance parameter value.

In the case below, I created a Annotation family and multiple Yes/No visibility parameters, which I applied to Lines:

PARAMETERAPPLIED.png

Then, I make a VisibilityEnum integer parameter, and set the Yes/No parameter formulas to a given integer:

FAMILYENVIRONMENT.png

You can also use Greater Than and other operators to show items that are visible across multiple visibility states:

operators.png

In the project environment, you only need to set one instance parameter to change visibility states:

project%2Benv.png

Finally, with some inventive use of Excel and Dynamo, you can drive this visibility parameter programmatically, even mapping the visibility state to the owner view of the family instance in Revit:

getAndSet.png

I saw a question like this on the forum so I had a quick go at it (see image below). Basically it checks what Family Types are placed against those loaded into the project, and then deletes unplaced component Families using SteamNodes Tool.Eraser:

Post flight family list:

Future versions of this could start looking at system families / types using similar methodology.

Jon Buerg recently posted his ‘top tips’ for content on Shoegnome. Here are three I particularly liked:

  1. If you can actually afford to invest the labor and time into producing a complete library all in one shot without interruption, you’ll be rewarded with a lower overall investment cost and time frame.
  2. Future-proof your library… follow IFC protocols for embedding data, like manufacturer and model number, into your library element. Do this from the start…
  3.  visit 3D Warehouse (https://3dwarehouse.sketchup.com),
    BIMcomponents (https://bimcomponents.com),
    BIMobject (https://bimobject.com/en),
    NBS National BIM Library (http://www.nationalbimlibrary.com),
    Revit City (http://www.revitcity.com/index.php),
    KCL CADalog (http://www.kclcad.com), and
    SmartBIM Library (http://library.smartbim.com)

via
Building Better BIM Libraries – Shoegnome

Also, don’t forget I have a (somewhat old) content list at:
http://wrw.is/p/this-is-temporary-content-table-link.html

 Here’s how you can get it:

  1. Go to https://beta.autodesk.com/callout/?callid=%7bA06CC6BE-3ADD-4789-AC64-CE5B1D9C8254%7d 
  2. Click Join Now
  3. From there you may have to login before you can go to the Download page
  4. Download and run installer (SeekForRevit150710Setup.exe)

The next time you run Revit, you will have an Autodesk Seek ribbon…

  1. Click Browse Content
  2. Type something in the search bar
  3. Click ‘Revit Supported Files‘ and then
  4. Click ‘Load Family to Design‘ next to the relevant RFA

Now is your opportunity to test this addin out and influence its development by providing feedback through the Beta site. As a simpler alternative to manually downloading, Loading and placing rfa files from Seek, it looks pretty good at this stage. What do you think?

via
Get the Autodesk Seek for Revit Plug-in | Autodesk 360

Aaron Maller, aka twiceroadsfool, has been sharing his Revit door family package on RevitForum for the past few years. If you haven’t seen it yet, you can check out his post in the thread here:
http://www.revitforum.org/architecture-family-creation/1242-doors-download-nested-panels-nested-frames.html

In the thread, he gives instructions on how the door families work, and a link to download the 179mb zip package:
First important part. The way they work is you only place the ones that say DOOR at the beginning of their name, obviously.

Download Link for the v4 Doors, a sample file with the doors in them, and the Door Schedule accompanying them, is here:
 https://www.dropbox.com/s/lcr5gobpuv…015v4.zip?dl=0

Thanks for sharing Aaron!

Older posts:
Doors for download, Nested Panels and Nested Frames..

Heads-up via http://notanotherrevit.blogspot.com.au/

So, you have received a RTE or RVT file (along with related CSV lookup tables) and want to upgrade it without getting the “One or more families in this project are missing .csv files” error…

For example, you may download a Piping Template (like this one from AUGI), and it comes with CSV files but you don’t know where to put them? Or you have received some other MEP template file from the wild, and you would like to upgrade and use it?

The thing with MEP content is that some of it is based on, or related to, Lookup Tables. These are text (CSV) files that contain type data, essentially making it easy to create and manage types without having to always use the Family Editor to do so. However, if these are missing, you will get an error message when you attempt to open or upgrade a project that needs them:

To fix this, you need to copy the required CSV files into the Pipe and Conduit subfolders of the Lookup Tables folder that matches the version of Revit that you are upgrading TO.

The key Project Browser tree entries are Conduit Fittings and Pipe Fittings:

If you have a Suite installed, you may find that these CSV files are duplicated in various locations, to provide support files for 3dsMax and Navisworks. Some of these paths are shown here:

You can browse to the above paths, and start to put together a “consolidated” or “combined” CSV Lookup Table folder, that you may want to maintain in a network location. Once you have collected all of the necessary CSVs, here is how you “install” them:

  1. Determine location to put the CSV files into (usually it will be near your Family Templates folder, a few example paths are provided below)
  2. Create a master folder of all required CSV files (you could maintain a consolidated folder in a network location)
  3. Copy these CSV files to the Pipe and Conduit folder locations (you shouldn’t need to restart Revit).
  4. Open the MEP RVT or template file that you wish to upgrade
  5. Any CSV files that are still missing are the ones you need to find, and put in the Pipe and Conduit subfolders as per steps 1-3.

You could script some of the above steps to aid in deployment.
Revit 2014 Lookup Tables default location:
C:ProgramDataAutodeskRVT 2014Lookup TablesPipe
C:ProgramDataAutodeskRVT 2014Lookup TablesConduit

Revit 2015 Lookup Tables default location:
C:ProgramDataAutodeskRVT 2015Lookup TablesPipe
C:ProgramDataAutodeskRVT 2015Lookup TablesConduit

NOTE: Massive amounts of CSV lookup tables in the default directory may result in slow Revit performance, particularly when starting Revit.

If you want to import Lookup Tables directly into families (and you are perhaps experiencing errors with nested families), this PDF may be of interest.

Finally, you can actually modify Lookup Table location using the revit.ini file, as described here. You could therefore point your Revit installations to a network location containing all of the required CSV files for your firm.

You can download content from Seek and other places online. Sometimes you will find a CSV file, sometimes you may have to export one as per the video below:

There is some related info at:
http://revitoped.blogspot.com.au/2008/10/revit-mep-lookup-tables.html

Feel free to comment if you have any other tips related to Lookup Tables…

I had the opportunity this week to spend a bit of time with Unifi. What is it? Well, in simple terms it is a way to store all of your Revit families in a secure location online. You just batch upload all of your current family library, and Unifi then goes ahead and indexes all of the important family related data. Then, you can do fast and intelligent searches of your entire content library whenever you want to find and load specific families into your Revit projects (using the Unifi addin for Revit).

However, it does a lot more than just ‘store’ stuff. It handles users and permissions in an efficient yet elegant manner, and guess what… because your cloud family library is now globally accessible, you can share it with project team members inside and outside of your domain or organization. You can set up different “libraries” based on their purpose (for example, the standard Revit Imperial/ Metric content can live in one library, while your “Essential” company content may be another, Healthcare families in another library and so forth). Tags can be applied to families, and the search function actually has learning algorithms, so it gets smarter as your team uses it.

What about different Revit versions, you say? Well, after you upload a Revit family from a given version (say 2012), the Unifi servers will automatically create 2013 and 2014 versions for you (automatic upgrading). In this way, there is a single point-of-truth for each family – you don’t get file folders full of different family versions with different functionality (a problem that BIM managers have been dealing with for years).

How many family professionals are in your team or company? Usually there are one or two users who are really at the top of the family tree, and they do your family development, content creation and the like. How can you quickly connect these highly skilled users with the actual day-to-day BIM technicians in your office? Unifi handles that too. Any user can “request” a new family if one doesn’t exist for a particular purpose, and this request is automatically passed onto the family creation people (by Unifi). When they login, they see a list of content requests, and can then handle them in a logical and methodical way. They make the family, upload it, and then the entire team has access to the new content.

Unifi is what Revit content management has needed for some time, in my opinion. You can easily download the trial, upload your content and see if you like it. Many Revit teams are struggling with a core set of challenges when it comes to content; Unifi provides solid answers to many of these questions.

I spent some time with Steve Germano (Director of Product Development) this week, and I was excited to hear about the plans to expand and upgrade the already-compelling feature set of Unifi (including branching out into the Sketchup realm). The development team over there clearly has a good view of what Revit users need, and they are already well on track to provide a solution that could easily become a key part of the Revit content management system in your organization. Additionally, they are listening to the current user base, and continuing to build the feature set with each new update.

If it sounds like these Unifi folk know what they are doing, it might because INVIEW labs is behind Unifi. And INVIEW labs does lots of Revit content development for Autodesk Seek. Are you getting the picture? (This is one of those times that you probably could just stop reading and go get the trial… or) Read on for a brief summary:

Unique, powerful features of Unifi:

  • your folder structure is automatically tagged onto your content when you Batch Upload it
  • batch user creation (is very fast!)
  • tracking of content requests – content creation can be centralised and distributed to key users
  • Shared Search Keywords (learning algorithm)
  • Smart Folders / Saved Searches
  • automatic upgrading of uploaded content (single point of truth for each family)
  • automatic versioning of changes to families (backup / rollback abilities)
  • extract any Revit System Family Type from an existing Revit Project and store them in the Unifi cloud – Wall Types etc (this includes complete MEP systems with required supporting families from Routing Preferences)

Latest release notes are at https://www.discoverunifi.com/release-notes.html

A few thoughts on the UX:

  • interface is very clean and smooth, and it fits the Windows 8 “style” of frameless dialogs etc
  • simple deployment – you don’t have to set up new local database instances or deal with local domain / file permission problems
  • auto updating feature works seamlessly and quickly
  • the Unifi pane can detect which Revit version is running and adapt to the current environment

You may be interested in this:
Case study link

Some final points of a somewhat geeky nature:

  • Steve mentioned that they have no server-side concerns with handling the bandwidth of company library uploads and downloads – the actual storage space is not an issue for them. Its interesting to consider really, because its something that might currently be a struggle for your company: trying to store and backup 100gb of Revit content on your local domain, and mirror that globally between offices, and keep it all in sync. That can be hard. But uploading it to Unifi and getting them to handle it all – much easier from an IT perspective.
  • A number of large firms have already made a commitment to the Unifi system. If it makes $$$ sense for the big guys, I think it will make sense for SMBs too.
  • There appears to be some validation in place, that will stop the upload of very bad Revit families (like the Room category family I made a while back) Video here.  
  • You can open the Unifi pane in headless mode (without Revit) by using the shortcut, which will likely be installed to this path:
    “C:Program Files (x86)INVIEWlabsUnifiUnifi.exe”
    This will allow you to drag and drop from Windows Explorer to directly batch upload to Unifi without opening Revit.
  • There is some good Unifi overview at this link

http://bit.ly/1spd0jt

Give it a go, and feel free to reply via comment to this post or tweet me @lukeyjohnson with your opinions!

Update 1:
Some people have expressed concern with having to download their families from the web to insert them into projects. Consider the following points:

  • you never have to deal with the upgrade screen as Unifi always inserts the native Revit version of the family (a good time saver)
  • Unifi has a local cache of any family you’ve downloaded (it internally stores the last 50 families you’ve downloaded) so you insert these from local HD anyway.
  • if you’ve already inserted a family into your project from Unifi, the next time you use Unifi to “insert” that family into your project it actually knows if the family in your current Revit project is the same revision as the one on the cloud, and it simply starts the family place command, it doesn’t actually download again. No reason to as it is already in the project
  • office to office bandwidth may be extremely expensive compared to internet bandwidth. Multi-office AEC firm CTO’s may prefer the fact that Unifi uses internet bandwidth and not their network bandwidth.
  • Unifi provides monthly full database downloads for customers, meaning that a rare internet outage is likely a very low risk to affect workflow.

Update 2:
If you want to clear your upload queue for Unifi, go to:
C:UsersUSERNAMEAppDataLocalINVIEWlabsDiscoverClientSettingsUploadQueue

Close the Unifi Pane, then delete all of the files in this folder. After restarting Unifi, your upload queue should be clear.

Update 3:
Download Unifi admin tutorial here:
https://discoverunifi.com/unifi/tutorial

    Video:

    via this tweet

    my tweet: