Over at ARCxl, you can download a bunch of Revit details for free.  According to the website, these details were all created natively in Revit.

The Terms of Use describes the proper way that these details may be utilised, and you must agree to these terms when you register. 

Effective July 19, 2011, two very significant alterations were made to the ARCxl website. We have added CAD/dwg, and PDF file formats to our library. We have also removed restrictions on account location and email address types.

Quoted from
ARCxl for Revit: ARCxl adds CAD/dwg, PDF and Eases Restrictions

 
Upon downloading a detail, you must also agree with this popup:

By clicking CONTINUE, I confirm I have read and agree to the ARCxl Terms of Use in their entirety. I agree to hold all liability for the use, review, compliance with all applicable laws, codes, and ordinances. I agree to seek professional review by an architect or engineer, and that ARCxl details and components are provided as-is without warranty of any kind. I understand that this is a single-use license and not a transfer of title.

Here is how to do it:

  1. Select the detail item.
  2. Right-click > Select All Instances > In Entire Project
  3. Attempt ‘Group’ command

It will fail with an error like this:

However the resulting Error Report contains the view names that all these elements exist in…

Click Expand >> and then Export…
Save the Error Report to a file and have fun going through them one by one 🙂

Paul Aubin has posted his RTC files for download.  In this package is a ‘Detailing Sandbox’ RVT file that includes a pretty comprehensive Wall Section that is annotated using Keynotes.  There is also folders with content related to Coordinates and to Finishes.

To quote:
For those of you who attended my sessions at RTC Australia, I mentioned that I would be posting the dataset files from those classes. I am not sure when the RTC folks will publish them to their site, but I thought I would get them posted here in the meantime. …

RTC Dataset Files | Paul F. Aubin

Here are some other links to RTC files for download:

Revit for Planning RTC USA files for download

Revit Conceptual Massing on a REAL Project (via Revit Futures)

Sometimes you will want a component family to ‘always’ show a certain label. In other words, you do not want to have to manually ‘tag’ the family after placing it in project. How can we do this?Basically, while in the component family (for example, a Plumbing family), load the following Annotation family:
Generic Label.rfa Now, place an instance of the annotation family. You can drag the type directly from the Project Browser and drop it into the Ref Level view.You should link the parameter in this annotation family to a parameter from the Plumbing host family (you should know how to do this by now!) When you load this Plumbing component into the project, it now comes with an ‘automatic tag’, of sorts. However, there are some things to keep in mind – the main one being that this annotation will show in any view where the host family is included in the view range – it will not be masked by geometry.So, use this method with care. I have found it useful for things like a Hot Water System family, where you always want to show ‘HW’ in plan views. And I have handled the visibility issue with some trickly view filters.

No doubt you issue many PDF files to consultants, Clients, Builders and the like. Why not add a URL link to your titleblock, so that anyone receiving your PDF files can jump directly to your webpage?

Its as simple as adding a parameter of type:URL into your titleblock.

To make it even easier for you, I have created a Generic Annotation family with a URL parameter inside it. Simply load this family into your titleblock, then link the parameter from it to a parameter in your titleblock (see image).
Here is the download link:

Now, when anyone opens this PDF, they can jump directly to your webpage.
The URLs worked fine for me using CutePDF and Adobe Reader, but Foxit Reader seemed to have an issue parsing the link correctly.