An interesting but sometimes blunt process that happens in firms is ‘ranking’ their Revit users by proficiency. There are various reasons to do this, and some of them make sense. In an ideal world, all of your Revit users are simply awesome and you have no skills problems. But yeah, real life ain’t that way is it?

So how do you go about it? And do you use those ratings primarily?

  1. To change how you run projects, or
  2. how you deliver training,
  3. or both?

I touched on the ‘Five Stages of a Revit User’ and the ‘6 Phases of a Revit User‘ in this post:
What Revit Wants: Revit users – Five Stages vs 6 Phases vs Hype Cycle

And KnowledgeSmart have shared a 3-tiered system here:
The KnowledgeSmart Blog: 3 Levels of Revit Proficiency

Personally, I think the success of Revit in your firm is likely more affected by culture and attitude. Are people being forced to implement something they don’t like or understand? That could be an uphill battle…

Check out this post for more on using Revit with the right attitude and mindset.


There have been different ways of accomplishing this over the years. Now, with Dynamo, I would use this simple two step process:

  1. Create a unique type for each Planting or Entourage element (as Height is a Type parameter)
  2. Randomize a list of values and write them into the Height parameter

It is super easy with Dynamo. Here is how you make the unique types (GUID from Bakery, Duplicate Type from Springs, SetType from Clockwork):

Then, just push the random values in, like this (the Set List node is in Bakery too):

My last attempt at this was here.

2018 has received its first little update, but the 2017 is a bit more significant. More info and links below…

Revit 2018.0.1 Hot Fix
Release Notes


  • Improved stability when using the pick line tool.*
  • Improved data integrity of the local project files after download operation when using Collaboration for Revit.

Revit 2017.2.1 Update 
Release Notes



Autodesk’s answer to realtime rendering from Revit is continuing its steady development. Now known as Autodesk Revit Live (formerly Autodesk LIVE), the new features include being able to choose visual styles for RPC, and support for Revit LT.

Direct download:

Help page

Online release notes:

New features:

LIVE Service
  • Level of Details geometry generation and material instancing have been added to the LIVE Service to enhance performance when working with large models and/or virtual reality.
Virtual Reality
  • The handle used to move and rotate the Minimap has been replaced by using the Controller Grip buttons. This provides a more natural and instinctive way to move, rotate, and scale your Minimap model.
People Styles and Animation
  • You can choose between three visual styles for the RPC characters imported from Revit as part of your scene.
  • Characters have subtle animation that can be turned on or off.
  • Characters can be hidden or made visible.
  • The view name is part of the default header.
  • The scene’s header is editable.
  • Texture orientation and offsets are consistent with what is set in Revit.
  • Customer texture files placed in C:\Program Files (x86)\Common Files\Autodesk Shared\Materials\Textures folder are used in LIVE service to generate the LIVE models.
  • Presentations published from scenes prepared from the same Revit file but different 3D views no longer overwrite each other.
Revit LT support
  • LIVE is available for Revit LT.


Interesting addition to DWG export:
Adds the option to export to DWG/DXF and DGN in True Color (RGB Values), as specified in the view.

I previously used some weird round trips via DGN to get the True Colors to DWG working.

Download link:

Release Notes:

Autodesk Revit 2017.2 Update Readme

Fellow Expert Elite Karam Baki has posted an interesting workaround for ‘converting’ between differently hosted Revit families. The term converting isn’t quite accurate, really we are just ‘nesting’ the hosted family into another family until we get to the hosting type that we want. There are times when this will help you, but other times you may go through all of this and then decide “hey, I should have just rebuilt that family properly from the start because Revit keeps crashing now” 🙂

Here’s the basic steps:

  1. Use a special middleman family with System category elements living inside it… (Karam has provided one on Google Drive)
  2. Load your hosted family into that special family and host it onto the object that it wants (Wall, Floor, Ceiling, Roof)
  3. Work with parameters as needed, link them through etc if needed.
  4. Save As ‘unhosted’ version of your family
  5. If needed, nest this again into a new, clean family based on whatever category / hosting you want
  6. Get origins, void cuts, openings working and link through the necessary parameters…

As a general comment, I’d say you should test thoroughly in your own environment, because this whole workflow is not really ‘#GoodRevit’ in the sense that we are breaking certain rules to get the results we want.

Along similar lines, you may remember the Copy / Monitor hack that allows converting between some different types of hosting:
Convert Family from Wall to Face based

Back in 2011 I posted about some related workflows, including the necessary steps to get System family elements in a normal Component family:
Save an In-Place Family as an RFA for use in another project
Create a Component Family with Category set to Walls (or other system family category)

You can also make unhosted Doors and Windows from scratch, like this:
Making unhosted components like unhosted Doors and Windows

Original post by Karam Baki:
Revit Tip: Save Time Converting Revit Families – Autodesk Community

You can watch his video here:

I have posted about SysExporter a few times before, but here is a little reminder… You can use SysExporter to grab text from almost any dialog box in any program in Windows. Let’s say you have a list of missing materials in a Revit Render dialog box. You can use SysExporter to grab that list so you can find the material images and rectify the problem.

Here’s how:

  1. Render a scene
  2. When the missing material dialog pops up, start SysExporter
  3. Find the dialog in the list (you can use the target to drag and drop onto the Rendering dialog)
  4. Once you find the list of names, you can copy / paste them, or export to a file
  5. Find the missing materials and point your Revit install at them using the Render Appearance Paths in Revit Options.

You can get it here.

This site usually focuses on intermediate to advanced workflows and topics, but here I just wanted to mention a couple of getting started resources that you may find useful. There is a new and comprehensive video playlist on the BIMscape channel, and I have embedded it here:

And don’t forget about the Autodesk Design Academy. For example, the link below will take you to a Revit and Architecture Fundamentals online training course. All for free, of course.