Process Explorer is a free and very powerful task manager that let’s you really see what is going on with your system… One of those things every IT person should have in their toolkit. You can get it here:

 Download Process Explorer (1.8 MB)

from this page

and here’s how to find out which process or program is locking a file or directory in Windows:

Go to Find > Find Handle or DLL. In the “Handle or DLL substring:” text box, type the path to the file (e.g. “C:\path\to\file.txt”) and click “Search”. All processes which have an open handle to that file should be listed.

Do you have a problem with your SSD getting maxed out by a bloated TEMP directory (%temp%) ? In Revit, you might have an issue with revittemp_ files, particularly if you are using massive federated models with lots of Revit links…

Maybe this is an ‘edge case’, but I’ve tweeted about this issue a couple of times:

Three big Revit instances. The revittemp files in %temp% folder cause disk space problems, even with 512gb SSD. pic.twitter.com/A0dpL6ca0u

— Luke Johnson (@lukeyjohnson) January 20, 2016

To stop this problem from affecting your main, system SSD hard drive disk space, you can move your Windows Temp directory. Here’s how:

Go to This PC, Properties:

temp1.png

Go to Advanced system settings:

temp2.png

Go to Advanced tab, Environment Variables:

temp3.png

Then for TEMP and TMP, edit the path:

temp4.png

And input a location on a larger, secondary hard drive:

temp5.png

Here are the same screenshots for TMP:

temp6.png

 

temp7.png

Then, restart your computer:

temp8.png

After restart, you should see files showing up in the new TEMP directory:

temp9.png

And when you open Revit file with links, you may see the revittemp_ files starting to appear:

temp10.png

After installing, just right-click on any file and select ‘Create Checksum File…’, then open the .md5 file that was created.

HashCheck Shell Extension

What is Hash or MD5 checking?
A cryptographic hash function is a deterministic procedure that takes an arbitrary block of data and returns a fixed-size bit string, the (cryptographic) hash value, such that an accidental or intentional change to the data will change the hash value. The data to be encoded is often called the “message”, and the hash value is sometimes called the message digest or simply digest.

Basically, when you download something important off the Net, it lets you know that the file has not been corrupted or modified in some nasty way…